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Solving the MU buzzer beating controversy

No, it’s not the one that everyone was talking about. I don’t have any other angles of the Carlino buzzer-beater, sorry. But Georgetown had a buzzer-beater of their own in the first half that turned out to be a big difference in the game.

Check the video below, starting at the 1:40 mark.

I’m not a ref (Lamar Simpson, Ed Corbett and Don Daily are), but there was clearly some shuffling in there. So let’s break it down step by step.

Step 1: Right foot

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

It’s tough to tell from the screen shot, but the ball is on the way up at this point and Tre Campbell’s foot has not hit, so when it does, it would be considered step 1. Obviously, this is difficult to judge in real time, but the ref has a perfect, unobstructed view.

Step 2: Left Foot

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

It’s pretty self explanatory.

Step 3: Right Foot

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

This is when the travel alarms should start going off for the refs.

Step 4: Left Foot

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

If Campbell takes off at this point, the hazy jump-stop could justify getting away with four steps, but ….

Step 5: Right Foot

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

Courtesy of Marquette Athletics via YouTube

No excuse. Blown call. 

Yes, one shot it in the first half doesn’t determine the outcome of the game. Yes, the ole defense by Juan Anderson is SMH worthy. Yes, this is whiny.

But again, this was an inexcusably blown call. How bout we make this type of play reviewable next year?

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Categories: Analysis

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5 Comments on “Solving the MU buzzer beating controversy”

  1. hoyahooligan
    January 25, 2015 at 12:50 am #

    Huh? The first two screen caps he’s still dribbling. He doesn’t stop dribbling till he takes 2 steps and puts up the shot. At worst it’s 3 steps. Hard to tell live action, but you completely discredit yourself by trying to claim 5 steps.

    • January 25, 2015 at 8:30 am #

      He’s not still dribbling, watch the video. But for the sake of you’re argument, let’s say those steps magically don’t count. Are 3 steps legal now?

      • hoyahooligan
        January 25, 2015 at 9:33 am #

        I did watch the video in slow mo and 1) yes those first two steps are part of him dribbling, but 2) yes he did get away with 3 steps.

        That being said. Marquette got a ton of home cooking in this game from the refs. Carlino pushes off on every single drive and got paraded to the FT line every time someone breathed on him. Marquette did nothing but set moving screens all game to free up their 3pt shooters who shot well above what would be expected of them. Marquette was lucky to even be in the game.

        Marquette got called for 3 first half fouls! 3! and you guys have the gall to complaint that the refs screwed you all game. Get out of here. I would say that Wojo brought the art of the Flop to Marquette, but Crowder and Gardner had been doing it at Marquette before Wojo got there.

        Yes the refs screwed up this call, but they screwed up plenty more like when Copeland blocked the ball of Fischer’s head. It clearly should’ve been Georgetown’s ball.

      • January 25, 2015 at 10:25 am #

        All this post looked at was one play, which you admitted was a travel. That’s it. The rest of your comment is interpretive and not in my domain.

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  1. Ten Signs You’re a Marquette Basketball Fan This Year | The College Tailgate - February 18, 2015

    […] mark you’ll see a clear travel that went uncalled by the officials. It’s emphasized in this article by […]

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